Showing results 1-3 of 3.

Cases using phrasing similar to:
"Even more crucially, no reasonable scientist would rely on this methodology in the face of voluminous epidemiological evidence to the contrary."

  Groobert v. PRESIDENT AND DIRS. OF GEORGETOWN COL. - Dist. of Columbia Circuit

Decided: 6/27/2002

The court therefore cannot evaluate Mr. Feingersh's reliability based on such Daubert factors as "whether the expert's technique or theory can be or has been tested" or "whether the technique or theory has been subject to peer review and publication" because of the apparent lack of information on the subject. ... The Supreme Court has recognized that "the factors identified in Daubert may or may not be pertinent in assessing reliability, depending on the nature of the issue, the expert's particular expertise, and the subject of his testimony."

Cited 19 times

  Barnes v. District of Columbia - Dist. of Columbia Circuit

Decided: 2/14/2013

It cannot evaluate Mr. Day's "reliability based on such Daubert factors as `whether the expert's technique or theory has been tested' or `whether the technique or theory has been subject to peer review and publication' because of apparent lack of information on the subject." ... The fact that the District could not find a reported decision certifying an expert who provides testimony about whether "an overdetention occurred," id., suggests that it is inappropriate to use the more rigid Daubert framework to determine whether Mr. Day's methods are reliable.

Cited 4 times

  Barnes v. District of Columbia - Dist. of Columbia Circuit

Decided: 2/13/2013

It cannot evaluate Mr. Day's "reliability based on such Daubert factors as `whether the expert's technique or theory has been tested' or `whether the technique or theory has been subject to peer review and publication' because of apparent lack of information on the subject." ... The fact that the District could not find a reported decision certifying an expert who provides testimony about whether "an overdetention occurred," id., suggests that it is inappropriate to use the more rigid Daubert framework to determine whether Mr. Day's methods are reliable.

Cited 0 times